Positions Elected by Troop


Senior Patrol Leader

Type:   Elected by the members of the troop

Reports to: Scoutmaster

Term: 6 months

Description:   The Senior Patrol Leader is elected by the Scouts to represent them as the top junior leader in the troop.

Comments:   The Senior Patrol Leader is the focal point of the troop.  He needs to attend as close to all troop functions as possible.  One of the major parts of the SPL's job is to appoint other troop leaders.  He must choose leaders who are able, not just his friends or other popular Scouts.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   1st Class or higher

Experience:   Previous service as SPL, ASPL, PL, or APL

     Training:   Have completed Pinetree

Attendance:   75% over previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 85% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that the Assistant Senior Patrol Leader is ready to assume your responsibilities.

 

SPECIFIC LEADERSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES

1.      Runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference.

2.      Runs the Patrol Leader's Council meeting.

3.      Appoints other troop junior leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster.

4.      Assigns duties and responsibilities to junior leaders.

5.      Assists the Scoutmaster with Junior Leader Training.


Positions Appointed By Senior Patrol Leader

ASSISTANT SENIOR PATROL LEADER

Type:   Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader

Reports to:  Senior Patrol Leader

Term: 6 months

Description:  The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader is the second highest ranking patrol leader in the troop.  The Assistant Senior Patrol Leader acts as the Senior Patrol Leader in the absence of the SPL or when called upon.  He also provides leadership to other junior leaders in the troop.

Comments:   The most important part of the ASPL position is his work with the other junior leaders.  The ASPL should be familiar with the other positions and stay current with the work being done.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   1st Class or higher

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over the previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 80% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.      Helps the Senior Patrol Leader lead meetings and activities.

2.      Runs the troop in the absence of the Senior Patrol Leader.

3.      Helps train and supervise the Troop Scribe, Quartermaster, Instructor, Librarian,

4.      Historian, and Chaplin Aide.

5.      Serves as a member of the Patrol Leader's Council.

TROOP LIBRIARIAN

Type:   Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader

Reports to:  Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Term: 6 months

Description:   The Troop Librarian takes care of troop literature.

Comments:   The library contains books of historical value as well as current materials.  All together, the library is a troop resource worth hundreds of dollars.  The Librarian manages this resource for the troop.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over the previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 60% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

  1. Sets up and takes care of a troop library
  2. Keeps records of books and pamphlets owned by the troop.
  3. Adds new or replacement items as needed. Keeps books and pamphlets available for borrowing.
  4. Keeps a system for checking books and pamphlets in and out.
  5. Follows up on late returns.
  6. Issues vouchers for purchase of used merit badge books.

TROOP QUARTERMASTER

Type:   Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader

Reports to:  Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Term: 6 months

Description: The Troop Quartermaster keeps track of troop equipment and sees that it is in good working order.

Comments:   The Quartermaster does most of his work around campouts.  There are times when the Quartermaster has to be available to check equipment in and out.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over the previous six months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 60% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.        Keeps records on patrol and troop equipment

2.        Makes sure equipment is in good working condition

3.        Issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition

4.        Makes suggestions for new or replacement items

5.        Works with the Troop Committee member responsible for equipment

6.        Gets the U.S. , troop, and patrol flags for meetings and ceremonies and puts them away afterwards.


TROOP SCRIBE

Type:   Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader

Reports to:  Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Term: 6 months

Description:  The Scribe keeps the troop records.  He records the activities of the Patrol Leaders' Council and keeps a record of dues, advancement, and Scout attendance at troop meetings.

Comments:  To be a good Scribe you need to attend nearly all troop and Patrol Leaders' Council meetings.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over the previous six months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 60% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.        Attends and keeps a log of Patrol Leaders' Council meetings

2.        Records individual Scout attendance.

3.        Works with the Troop Committee members responsible for records and finance.

4.        Posts troop meeting agenda and calendar information to the troops website.


TROOP HISTORIAN

Type:   Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader

Reports to:  Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Term: 6 months

Description:  The Troop Historian keeps a historical record or scrapbook of troop activities.

Comments:  The true value of a good Historian does not show up until years later.  The Historian provides material for displays and presentations of current activities.  In addition, the work of the Historian provides a link with the past.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none, but interest in photography is helpful

Attendance:   50% over the previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 60% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.        Gathers pictures and facts about past troop activities and keeps them in a historical file or scrapbook.

2.        Takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities.

3.        Keeps information about former members of the troop.


CHAPLAIN AIDE

Type:   Appointed by the Senior Patrol Leader

Reports to:  Assistant Senior Patrol Leader

Term: 6 months

Description:  The Chaplin Aide works with the Troop Chaplin to meet the religious needs of Scouts in the troop.  He also works to promote the religious awards program.

Comments:   "Duty to God" is one of the core beliefs of Scouting.  The Chaplin Aide helps everyone in the troop by preparing short religious observations for campouts and other functions.  The Chaplin Aide does not always lead the observation himself and can have other troop members help.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over the previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 60% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.       Assists the Troop Chaplin with religious services at troop activities.

.       Tells Scouts about the religious emblem program for their faith.

3.       Makes sure religious holidays are considered during troop program planning.

4.       Helps plan for religious observance in troop activities.

5.       Provides pray support during troop activities as requested by the Senior Patrol Leader.


Positions Appointed by Scoutmaster


TROOP GUIDE

Type:   Appointed by the Scoutmaster

Reports to: Scoutmaster

Term: 1 year

Description: The Troop Guide works with new Scouts.  He helps them feel comfortable and earn their First Class rank in their first year.

Comments:   The first year as a Boy Scout is a critical time with new places, new people, new rules, and new activities.  The Troop Guide is a friend to the new Scouts and makes first year fun and successful.  This is an important position.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   14 or older

           Rank:   1st Class or higher

Experience:   none

Attendance:   75% over previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 90% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.       Introduces new Scouts to troop operations.

2.       Guides new Scouts through early Scouting activities

3.       Shields new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts.

4.       Helps new Scouts earn First Class in their first year.

5.       Teaches basic Scout skills.

6.       Coaches the patrol leader of the new Scout patrol on his duties.

7.       Works with the patrol leader at Patrol Leaders' Council meetings.

8.       Attends Patrol Leaders' Council meetings with the patrol leader of the new Scout patrol.

9.       Assists the Assistant Scoutmaster with training.

10.   Counsels individual Scouts on Scouting challenges.


INSRUCTOR

Type:   Appointed by the Scoutmaster

Reports to: Scoutmaster

Term: 1 year

Description:   The Instructor teaches Scouting skills.

Comments:   The Instructor will work closely with both the Troop Guide and with the Assistant Scoutmaster for new Scouts.  The Instructor does not have to be an expert but should be able to teach the Scoutcraft skills needed for Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks.  The troop can have more than one instructor.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   13 or older

           Rank:   1st Class or higher

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 75% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.       Teaches basic Scouting skills in troop and patrols.


DEN CHIEF

Type:   Appointed by the Scoutmaster

Reports to: Scoutmaster and Den Leader

Term: 1 year

Description:  The Den Chief works with the Cub Scouts, Webelos Scouts, and Den Leaders in the Cub Scout pack.

Comments:   The Den Chief provides a knowledge of games and Scout skills that many Den Leaders lack.  The Den Chief is also a recruiter for the troop.  This function is important because no troop can thrive without new members and most new members will come from Cub Scouting.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   14 or older

           Rank:   Star or higher

Experience:   none

Attendance:   75% over prevous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 75% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

                       In terms of attendance with your den, you are expected to attend 90% of den meetings and pack functions.  You must inform the Den Leader if you will be absent.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.       Knows the purposes of Cub Scouting

2.       Helps Cub Scouts advance through Cub Scout ranks.

3.       Encourages Cub Scouts to join a Boy Scout troop upon graduation.

4.       Assists with activities in the den meetings.

5.       Is a friend to the boys in the den.

6.       Helps out at weekly den meetings and monthly pack meetings.

7.       Meets with adult members of the den, pack, and troop as necessary.


JUNIOR ASSISTANT SCOUTMASTER

Type:   Appointed by the Scoutmaster

Term:   1 year

Reports to:  Scoutmaster

Description:   The Junior Assistant Scoutmaster serves in the capacity of an Assistant Scoutmaster except where legal age and maturity are required.  He must be at least 16 years old and not yet 18.  He's appointed by the Scoutmaster because of his leadership ability.

Comments:   In many cases the JASM has the same responsibilities as an Assistant Scoutmaster.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   At least 16 years old

           Rank:   Eagle

Experience:   Previous leadership positions

     Training:   Completed Pinetree

Attendance:   75% over the previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 80% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

  1. Functions as an Assistant Scoutmaster.
  2. Performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster.


Positions Elected by Patrol


PATROL LEADER

Type:   Elected by members of the patrol

Term:   6 months

Reports to:  Senior Patrol Leader

Description:  The Patrol Leader is the elected leader of his patrol.  He represents his patrol on the Patrol Leader's Council.

Comments:   The Patrol Leader may easily be the most important job in the troop.  He has the closest contact with the patrol members and is in the perfect position to help and guide them.  The Patrol Leaders, along with the Senior Patrol Leader and Assistant Senior Patrol Leader are the primary members of the Patrol Leaders' Council.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none

Attendance:   75% over previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 80% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that the Assistant Patrol Leader is ready to assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

  1. Appoints the Assistant Patrol Leader.
  2. Represents the patrol on the Patrol Leader's Council
  3. Plans and steers patrol meetings
  4. Helps Scouts advance
  5. Acts as the chief recruiter of new Scouts
  6. Knows what his patrol members and other leaders can do.


Positions Appointed by Patrol Leader


ASSISTANT PATROL LEADER

Type:   Appointed by the Patrol Leader

Term:   6 months

Reports to:  Patrol Leader

Description:   The Assistant Patrol Leader is appointed by the Patrol Leader and leads the patrol in his absence.

Comments:   Substituting for the Patrol Leader is only part of the Assistant Patrol Leader's job.  The APL actively helps run the patrol.

 

Qualifications

            Age:   none

           Rank:   none

Experience:   none

Attendance:   50% over previous 6 months

 

Performance Requirements

     Training:   You must attend the troop Junior Leader Training even if you have attended in the past.

Attendance:   You are expected to attend 75% of all troop meetings, Patrol Leaders' Council meetings, outings, and service projects.  If your attendance is low, or if you have three (3) unexcused absences in a row, you can be removed from office.

          Effort:   You are expected to given this job your best effort.

 

General Leadership Responsibilities

      Uniform:   Set the example by wearing your uniform correctly.  This means that you will wear all of the parts of the troop uniform, shirttail tucked in, with all required badges in their correct locations.

    Behavior:   Set the example by living the Scout Oath and Law in your everyday life.  Show Scout Spirit in everything you say and do.

Attendance:   Set the example by being an active Scout.  Be on time for meetings and activities.  You must call the Senior Patrol Leader or Scoutmaster if you are not going to be at a meeting or if you suddenly have to miss an outing.  You also need to make sure that someone will assume your responsibilities.

 

Specific Leadership Responsibilities

1.       Helps the Patrol Leader plan and steer patrol meetings and activities.

2.       Helps the Patrol Leader keep patrol members informed.

3.       Helps the patrol get ready for all troop activities.

4.       Represents his patrol at Patrol Leader's Council meetings when the Patrol Leader cannot attend.

5.       Lends a hand controlling the patrol and building patrol spirit.